Blood pressure (BP) is the pressure exerted by circulating blood on the walls of blood vessels, and constitutes one of the principal vital signs. The pressure of the circulating blood decreases as it moves away from the heart through arteries and capillaries, and toward the heart through veins. Blood pressure tends to rise with age. Following a healthy lifestyle helps some people delay or prevent this rise in blood pressure.

High blood pressure increases your chance (or risk) for getting heart disease and/or kidney disease, and for having a stroke. It is especially dangerous because it often has no warning signs or symptoms. Regardless of race, age, or gender, anyone can develop high blood pressure. It is estimated that one in every four American adults has high blood pressure. Once high blood pressure develops, it usually lasts a lifetime.

High blood pressure is the most important risk factor for stroke. Very high pressure can cause a break in a weakened blood vessel, which then bleeds in the brain. This can cause a stroke. High blood pressure can eventually cause blood vessels in the eye to burst or bleed. Vision may become blurred or otherwise impaired and can result in blindness. As people get older, arteries throughout the body “harden,” especially those in the heart, brain, and kidneys. High blood pressure is associated with these “stiffer” arteries. This, in turn, causes the heart and kidneys to work harder. The kidneys act as filters to rid the body of wastes. Over time, high blood pressure can narrow and thicken the blood vessels of the kidneys. The kidneys filter less fluid, and waste builds up in the blood. The kidneys may fail altogether.

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart attack. The arteries bring oxygen-carrying blood to the heart muscle. If the heart cannot get enough oxygen, chest pain, also known as “angina,” can occur. If the flow of blood is blocked, a heart attack results. High blood pressure is the number one risk factor for congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF is a serious condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to supply the body’s needs.

The important nutrients needed by a person suffering from high blood pressure are Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc, and Vitamin E. Moringa contains these entire nutrient in it. Moringa contains Vitamin C helps support the body’s production of nitric oxide, which is critical to normal functioning of blood vessels. The better your blood vessels work, the lower your risk of hypertension. Calcium is needed for smooth muscle relaxation and contraction; increased consumption can have a direct effect on blood vessels. It’s best to get your calcium from your diet; studies have found that compared with supplements, dietary calcium has twice the benefits for blood pressure. Potassium content of the Moringa is 15 times more compared to Banana. This high potassium tends to lower the sodium content. Potassium is thought to act by increasing sodium excretion in the urine, which helps blood vessels dilate, and changing the interactions of hormones that affect blood pressure.

Diet high in magnesium benefits those with hypertension, most likely by contributing to the relaxation of the smooth muscles of the blood vessels. Moringa also contains magnesium along with zinc and vitamin E which takes part in decreasing the blood pressure along with other nutrients.